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Desigual's four pillars of transformational change

Desigual retail director Arantxa Gomez told Drapers Fashion Forum about the retailer’s transformation strategy.

The plan involves four key pillars of change, encompassing the business areas of product, brand and consumer and omnichannel trading, which the brand calls its “integrated marketplace”.

Emotion

The first pillar, Gomez says, is focusing on how the brand makes people feel: “We’re a fashion company but we don’t sell clothes – we make customers feel different with our garments.” The aim is to make people feel unique, and for the brand’s clothes to make people feel different.

Validation and reach

“This is all about asking: how do people that really believe in our brand talk about it?” Gomez says this means social media, influencers and superfans, but it also means making sure employees are happy. “So many companies forget that employees are the ones who talk about the brand. It’s so important that they feel comfortable and share our values.”

Activation

“This is about making customers feel part of the experience,” says Gomez. “As part of this we run huge campaigns that aren’t necessarily about selling.”

One example was the brand’s kiss tour. It encouraged interaction between attendees and was popular with the brand’s younger fans. This part of the strategy is all about how the brand takes care of its customers, she adds.

Access

Gomez says: “How do we make our product and experience visible to the customer? This question is related to the fact that the customer doesn’t care about channels – they just want the product.”

For Desigual, this means continuing to open high street stores. “The high street is important if customers are looking for you there. Plus, you have to have a house that the customer enjoys. You need to create a meaningful experience in store.”

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