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Textiles Report: Fabrics of the future

The Future Fabrics Expo showcased a selection of textiles that could lead to greener fashion.

Guangzhou Tianhai Lace

Guangzhou Tianhai Lace

Guangzhou Tianhai Lace

Chinese mill Guangzhou Tianhai Lace creates beautiful laces by blending recycled polyester and nylon. Full-width laces are produced and blended with sustainable fibres, and a range of lingerie laces is also blended with green, recycled fibres.

The mill works to be greener while making these products, using a waste-water treatment and recycling system that has reduced water consumption by 70% since 2000.

Contact: 00 86 20 82 30 30 28

www.tianhailace.com

Singtex

Singtex

Singtex

Ever wondered what happens to the waste coffee grounds from your daily caffeine shot? Taiwanese firm Singtex transforms this post-consumer waste into fibres for insulation and performance fabrics using an innovative patented process. Eco2sy is one example; designed for use in performance outerwear, it is fast-drying and boasts UVA and UVB protection, as well as built-in odour control.

Contact: 00 88 62 85 12 78 88

www.singtex.com

Susan Gaunt for Laxtons

Susan Gaunt for Laxtons

Susan Gaunt for Laxtons

A partnership between Susan Gaunt and specialist yarns manufacturer Laxtons has resulted in a fully traceable British wool called Forty Miles from Fleece to Fabric. All processing takes place within a 40-mile radius, from the fleece leaving the British Wool Marketing Board sorting office in Bradford, to the finished cloth, which is signed off in Huddersfield.

Contact: 01943 877123

www.laxtons.com

Incalpaca

Incalpaca

Incalpaca

Everyone knows the luxury of cashmere, but what about alpaca? Peruvian firm Incalpaca supports hundreds of alpaca herdsmen to promote and preserve the fibre. With up to eight natural shades there is no dyeing process - and unlike wool, aplaca has no lanolin, meaning there is no need for harsh detergent washing. Also, on average alpacas produce more fibre than any other fine fibre creature - take that sheep.

Contact: 00 51 54 60 30 00

www.incalpaca.com

 

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