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New York Fashion Week Autumn 14

The autumn 14 women’s catwalk season kicked off in a snowy NYC - we pick the top Stateside trends.

DKNY

DKNY

Mannish tailoring

A trend worth noting as a growing alternative to eveningwear dresses. Womenswear designers looked to men’s wardrobes for inspiration this autumn, with smart masculine tailoring featuring in several collections. Trousers came skinny and cropped for a feminine take or loose and oversized for a more relaxed vibe. On top, there was a mix of closely tailored skinny blazer-like jackets or boxy, wide-shouldered tuxedo jackets, often featuring contrast fabric lapels.

Roll-necks

Tory Burch

Tory Burch

As seen in Drapers’ Womenswear Special, chunky roll-necks are set to be a major knitwear trend for autumn 14.

From longer-length dresses to boxier cropped jumpers, the style sits well under the collarless coats that are emerging this season. For a more dramatic look, there were thicker ribbed roll-necks at Oscar de la Renta and Edun, or for a pared back, sportier silhouette, look for folded-over styles as seen at Lacoste.

 

Altuzarra

Altuzarra

Wrap Coats

Despite oversized outerwear still being a key trend in New York, a classic silhouette re-emerged in the form of wrap coats. Belted and cinched at the waist and with sharper shoulders, the style is one of the more sophisticated trends for autumn 14.

 

 

 

Super-sized coats

Proenza Schouler

Proenza Schouler

Outerwear is oversized for autumn, with elongated calf-length shapes and pumped-up, boxier silhouettes standing out. Classic trench coats and overcoats lend a masculine feel, while chunky fabrics add to the look, with thick wool and fuzzy textures such as fur and shearling adding even more volume. If your customer is after a less dramatic, but still fashion-forward style, opt for pieces with details such as wide lapels and oversized buttons, as seen at Proenza Schouler and Creatures of the Wind.

 

Jason Wu

Jason Wu

Halternecks

One of the key trends to come out of the recent couture shows, halternecks remained a popular neckline for dresses in New York.

The more daring and revealing 1990s-inspired incarnations are likely to catch on quickly with young fashion customers, particularly the strappy styles seen at the likes of Cushnie Et Ochs and Diane von Furstenberg. However, more sedate, less skin-baring silhouettes emerged from Jason Wu and Peter Som, proving that the trend can work for elegant eveningwear as well.

Red alert

Duckie Brown

Duckie Brown

Ladies in red proved an eye-catching trend for autumn, with shades from blood orange to tomato seen in many collections. Matching separates were popular at Duckie Brown and Helmut Lang, while Karen Walker used contrasting tones to build a daytime look. For eveningwear, Zac Posen and Victoria Beckham presented high-impact dresses in solid colour.

 

 

Jenny Packham

Jenny Packham

Exaggerated textures

Furry and fuzzy textures covered the New York catwalks, as designers used cosy fabrics and interesting finishes to give an opulent feel to winter outerwear. Both real and fake furs were prominent, alongside shaggy and shaved shearling and leather. While the catwalk showed some directional ways to buy into the trend, buyers can play it more safely by looking out for textured panels or trims. It’s a look that works for day or evening.

 

Statement gilets

Rodarte

Rodarte

What with the UK’s unpredictable weather, buyers have told Drapers at recent trade shows that they are focusing on more transitional pieces that can work throughout the season regardless of sun or snow. A great way to buy into this is through layering items such as sleeveless gilets. In New York these were luxed up in fluffy shearling, fur and leather (real and faux) and came layered over chunky knits or under lighter outerwear.

 

Talking points

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Marc by Marc Jacobs

Marc by Marc Jacobs

The most anticipated show of New York was undoubtedly the first Marc by Marc Jacobs collection designed by British designers Katie Hillier and Luella Bartley, who were announced as creative director and womenswear design director respectively last May. Taking over the helm of Jacobs’ diffusion label is no mean feat, especially with the designer himself seated on the front row, but the duo brought a touch of British eccentricity to the typically pared-back New York scene.

Blown-up tartan, punchy slogans and patchwork jeans stood out as the more commercial aspects, while oversized bows and net skirts added a fun dimension to the youthful range.

Jason Wu for Hugo Boss

Jason Wu for Hugo Boss

Jason Wu for Hugo Boss

Independent retailers’ favourite Hugo Boss has a new womenswear artistic director in the form of Jason Wu, the go-to designer for First Lady Michelle Obama. His first collection for the brand blended his signature femininity with a nod to masculine tailoring - one of the key trends for the season. Workwear pieces such as grey flannel blazers and skirts stood out as potential bestsellers, while some of the softer, more embellished pieces demonstrated a newer, girlish direction without alienating the core customer.

Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

Victoria Beckham

Even the presence of her husband and four children sitting on the front row couldn’t outshine Victoria Beckham’s autumn 14 collection. Beckham moved her offer forward, blending precise cuts and sexy sharp tailoring with a feminine softness.

With her first store opening on London’s Dover Street this autumn, she’ll have an accomplished collection to fill its rails with.

 

  • Images provided by Catwalking

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