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DCLG unveils plans to 'tackle aggressive parking policies'

The Department for Communities and Local Government has launched a consultation to “tackle aggressive parking policies” aimed at encouraging shoppers back into town centres.

It is also planning a review of double yellow lines, with plans to create “grace periods”, and stopping CCTV from being used for enforcement.

The government will also cap increases in parking penalty charges with immediate effect.

The new initiatives come on the back of last week’s Autumn Statement, with DCLG highlighting the “billion-pound package” relating to business rates and small business relief.

Communities secretary Eric Pickles said: “The way we use our high streets is changing and the measures unveiled today give councils more power to reflect that in the way their high streets look and operate.

“New tax breaks for shops and sensible changes to over-zealous parking rules will help make high streets more attractive to shoppers. And by providing excellent local services and offering communities a vibrant place to spend their leisure time and money, local authorities can secure the future of their high streets for many years to come.”

Transport secretary Patrick McLoughlin added: “Unfair parking fines blight the use of our high streets and force shoppers out of towns. We want to rein back aggressive rules by banning the use of CCTV for parking enforcement, reviewing the use of yellow lines, and giving shoppers a ‘grace period’ to get back to their car after their ticket has run out before they get fined.

“We will also update guidance to emphasise a less heavy-handed approach to parking enforcement and to reinforce that charges and fines cannot be used as a means to raise cash.”

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