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Designer Joe Casely-Hayford dies aged 62

Designer Joe Casely-Hayford passed away last night, aged 62, having had cancer for three years.

Friend of the family Mark C O’Flaherty said: “Casely-Hayford could be subversive, but his work was always grounded in sartorial excellence. He created suits for prime ministers and rock stars, from Lou Reed to The Clash. When Bono was the first man to appear on the cover of British Vogue, in 1992, it was wearing Joe Casely-Hayford.”

Casely-Hayford launched his first eponymous menswear label in 1984.

O’Flaherty said: “When Casely-Hayford launched his first eponymous label in 1984, he was at the heart of a revolution in London fashion that forged a new identity for the city as a place of radical innovation. He was the gentleman tailor within a tightly-knit scene of iconoclast designers and labels that included John Galliano, BodyMap and Richmond/Cornejo. He became an integral and much-loved part of the lexicon of London street style.

“The construction of a Casely-Hayford suit is a feat of engineering – from the prominent chest with special internal darting to the prominent sleeve head roll, shaped sleeve with high underarm point and natural sloping shoulders.”

He met his wife Maria Stevens while studying at Central St Martins and together they had two children – Charlie (born in 1986) and Alice (1989).

In 2009, Joe launched a new Casely-Hayford streetwear label with Charlie to international acclaim. The label opened its first standalone store on Chiltern Street in London in 2018, selling both men’s and womenswear. 

 

Readers' comments (1)

  • So sad to read this ...he is gone far to soon
    Joe was a friendly face at some of the early trade shows we did in Paris and Florence in the early 90's , at a time when not everyone was friendly -he came to a couple of our parties ..always had a smile and an encouraging word ~ a gentleman ~
    Wishing his family a long life ..

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