Your browser is no longer supported. For the best experience of this website, please upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Marks & Spencer partners with True to access tech start-ups

Marks & Spencer has partnered with retail and consumer investment firm True to access new innovations and technology from start-ups that it can implement into its business operations, as part of its plans to become a “digital-first retailer”.

The agreement will give M&S access to True’s Live Network, which comprises more than 2,000 technology and consumer-product start-ups each year.

M&S chief executive Steve Rowe said the deal will give the retailer “unparalleled access to the latest innovations and technologies that have the potential to transform the way we operate and run our business”.

True was founded by Matt Truman and Paul Cocker in 2013 after they sold their stake in start-up kidswear etailer alexandalexa.com to US investment firm Tiger. It works with retailers such as Abercrombie & Fitch, John Lewis and Morrisons on its Live Network.

True bought a majority stake in organic kidswear brand Frugi last month to support its “ongoing scalable growth”.

Last week M&S announced it was creating a data academy with London-based education business Decoded to train staff in every area of the business in data skills, as part of its ongoing transformation programme.

On the latest partnership with True, Rowe said: “As M&S seeks to become a digital-first retailer, we will be on the front foot thanks to True’s deep sector knowledge and the exposure they will give us to new enterprise-ready technologies which will benefit our customers and make us fit for the future.”

 

Readers' comments (1)

  • Lots of PR noise to soften the blow of the next trading statement. True only promotes startups they invest in. Biased advice from the outset.

    Unsuitable or offensive? Report this comment

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.