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Retail parks could lead retail recovery

Retail parks are likely to lead the retail recovery and will emerge from the downturn as a more attractive shopping destination than traditional town centre locations, according to a report by Verdict Research.

As a result of increased investment by landlords and improvements to the mix of retailers and facilities on offer in retail parks, Verdict expects out-of-town retail sales to grow by 23.2% over the next five years against 0.4% sales growth in town centres.

The Verdict report will suprise the industry, as out-of-town retailing is understood to have fared worse than town centres in recent months with shoppers opting to go to local high streets over driving long distances to retail parks because of rising petrol prices.

"Out-of-town retailing will have to become a more attractive shopping location, appealing to a broader spectrum of society and shoppers," said Malcolm Pinkerton, senior analyst at Verdict Research and author of the report.

"The key to its future growth lies in improving facilities and a greater choice of shops that collectively generate high levels of footfall, longer dwell times and higher spend per head," Pinkerton added.

Richard Lowe, head of retail and wholesale for London at Barclays Commercial Bank, added: "Out-of-town retailers are well poised to take advantage of the upswing that will follow the current challenging economic conditions. The sheer amount of space in out-of-town retail parks provides retailers with the opportunity to broaden and diversify their offering to customers."

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Readers' comments (4)

  • "Out-of-town retailing will have to become a more attractive shopping location, appealing to a broader spectrum of society and shoppers," said Malcolm Pinkerton, senior analyst at Verdict Research and author of the report.

    "The key to its future growth lies in improving facilities and a greater choice of shops that collectively generate high levels of footfall, longer dwell times and higher spend per head," Pinkerton added.




    IS THIS FOR REAL????!!!! rofl.

    This research kind of goes against all the sub ttrends at the moment!!!!
    I'll remember this in 5 years time...to see if the research is right ir if Pinkerton is working the night shift in Tescos.

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  • yes out of town has space and free parking, but they are also bland cloned destinations, poor service, no point of difference. There has also been major investments into city centres over the past 10 years - Bullring, High Cross Leicester, Exeter Plymouth Bristol High Wycombe - retail recovery is coming from strong premium brands combined with service - to be found in quality independents

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  • I think the key to this is parking. How often have I heard from my regular customers that they have tried and failed to visit me more often due to the lack of available parking nearby? People do not want to have to walk any distance to get to their favourite shops. More, affordable local parking needs to be made available if the town centres are not to become ghost towns.

    Helen Michell, Azure, Little Chelsea, Eastbourne

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  • Martin Ailion

    Yeah right, if the shopper only wants the same boring mix of Multiple retailers. I believe the savvy shopper will want something different and that niche retailers on local High Streets will give them that. That's where things will improve.

    Martin Ailion

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