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Milan Fashion Week

A wealth of trends graced the Milanese catwalks but it was Christopher Kane at Versus and Prada that stole the show

Milan Fashion Week served up a plethora of trends, but failed to deliver one clear, unified story for the season.

There were plenty of feminine forms gracing the catwalks but it was mannish, boxy tailoring along with clean and covered-up separates that dominated. This played well against a modish, 1960s direction that surfaced at the likes of Alberta Ferretti and Jil Sander. The Jil Sander collection received a Marmite-like reaction as it served up clean and basic militant purity with flashes of colour and kooky intarsia knits.

Prada’s offering was challenging, both in aesthetic terms and wearability. Its mod-inspired silhouettes were punctuated with chaotic shaggy fur finishes and block colours in difficult-to-wear shades.

However, the collection was striking, as was Christopher Kane’s at Versus. The fashion pack claim the he hit his stride at the house for autumn 11, but Drapers would suggest he did that last season and the season before - each of Kane’s collections for Versus has been a triumph.

Milan would not be complete without Gucci, and its collection oozed glamour and sex appeal. Even though the palette of azure and emerald green and the 1970s references weren’t a huge leap on from spring 11, it displayed the comfortable confidence Gucci has in its handwriting and brand identity, which was nice to see during a frenzied week.

For more images and coverage from Milan, go to www.drapersonline.com/milan

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