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Milan catwalks: 11 menswear autumn 17 collections to know

Prada index

Catch up on the best autumn 17 menswear from the Milan catwalks, from Prada’s cosy 1970s style to Dolce and Gabbana’s opulent new royalty.

Fendi’s 1980s aesthetic

Fendi

Fendi

Moody eighties tailoring and boxy silhouettes, alongside sports stripes redolent of 1980s ski gear, and eye-catching patterns made Fendi’s menswear collection chic, sophisticated and daring. Highlights included a white shearling jacket with painted patches and a multi-coloured striped coat, paired with fuzzy slogan pool slider shoes.

Surreal detailing at Marni

Marni

Marni

Francesco Risso’s debut for Marni introduced a sense of double-take dressing to the catwalk. On first look, slouchy shaping and a colour palette of vibrant earthy tones, burnt oranges, beiges and greens dominated. On second glance however, the details become the focus: button-fronted trousers, embroidered utility belts and fur elbow patches and sleeves give a bold surrealism that was further highlighted by the clashing patterns and patchwork prints.

Monochrome suiting dominates at Neil Barrett

Neil barrett

Neil barrett

Sharp suiting and minimal separates were the focus of a sleek autumn collection from Neil Barrett. Long-line overcoats appeared alongside dual-length jackets and blazers cinched at the waist by oversized utility belts that doubled as bags. The colour palette was overwhelmingly monochrome: black, white and grey looks dominated the offering. Dashes of primary colours increased as the looks progressed, moving from stripe detailing on trousers to full-block colour leather blazers and shirts.

Prada’s cosy 1970s styling

Prada

Prada

Miuccia Prada claimed her autumn 17 menswear collection was inspired by a desire for reality, normality and simplicity. While the aesthetic was distinctly 1970s inspired, the palette of warm neutrals, tactile knits, slouchy cords and fuzzy furs created a cosy warmth and nostalgic ease. Sweaters with watercolour scenes and in patchwork patterns were key items, alongside the leather hats which topped numerous looks.

Versace’s high-end grunge

Versace

Versace

Powerful shaping and sumptuous fabrics gave the Versace collection a luxurious appearance: leathers, vinyl and tapestry patterning in black, white and red created a moody atmosphere. Plaid was reinterpreted in a series of puffa jackets and macs, as well as on shirts and jumpers, which gave a grunge undertone to the collection, offsetting the typically sensual Versace styling.

Tailoring meets athletic at Cédric Charlier’s menswear debut

Cedric charlier

Cedric charlier

After five years as a womenswear designer, this was the debut menswear collection from Cedric Charlier. Easy elegance and soft minimalism dominated, with oversized tailoring, sportswear styling, block colours and a muted palette the key themes within the collection. Greys and pastel colours were punctuated by blocks of bold oranges and reds, with polo necks and sweatshirts creating a sporty silhouette under softly tailored suits.

Dolce & Gabbana’s opulent new royalty

Dolce and gabbana

Dolce and gabbana

A new kind of royalty was celebrated on Dolce & Gabbana’s autumn 17 catwalk. Opulent brocade fabrics, luxurious puffer coats, velvet smoking jackets and decadent detailing fused with street shapes of hoodies and bomber jackets, giving a typically extravagant, street-luxe aesthetic. This new luxury was modelled by a line-up of 49 of the biggest social media influencers. Cameron Dallas (17.5 million Instagram followers), Jim Chapman (2.3 million Instagram followers) and Marcus Butler (3.6 million Instagram followers), were among those taking part.

Elegant melancholia from Giorgio Armani

Giorgio armani

Giorgio armani

This season’s predilection for darkness continued at Armani in a show dominated by signature blacks, blues and greys. The overall sense was one of refined, modern gothic glamour, while slouchy trousers and bomber jackets hinted at a casual ease. Velvet and fur textures added to the elegant melancholia of the collection, while hints of playfulness appeared in the twisted wool shawls, which were part sleeve, part scarf, and the metallic dog print jackets.

Ermenegildo Zegna’s refined sports luxe

Milan zegna

Milan zegna

Ermenegildo Zegna’s new designer, Alessandro Sartori, began his career at the Z Zegna sports range, and in his first collection for the main line hints of this athletic past crept in to traditional tailoring. The overall effect was relaxed formalwear, cut through with sportswear influences. While this is a trend emerging across the Milan shows, Zegna’s approach was slightly more muted, thanks to a neutral palette. Hoodies, caps and roll necks were paired with tonal suiting and cleanly cut outerwear, giving an elevated take to the sports-luxe movement.

Missoni’s muted playful prints

Missoni

Missoni

Autumnal ombre jumpers in cosy knits and heritage check jackets were the key looks in Missoni’s cosy catwalk. Patterns and prints were bold in design, with signature swirls and stripes set alongside plaid, with a warmly muted colour palette which had hints of the 1970s in tones and patterning alongside more contemporary references in the shaping of bombers, snapbacks and duffle coats.

Moschino’s beautifully chaotic creations

Moschino

Moschino

Jeremy Scott doesn’t do minimalism. With references including 1980s sci-fi, spies, army camouflage, the baroque and even the pearly kings and queens – this autumn collection was a theatrical mishmash of prints, shapes and influences that was almost overwhelming. Somehow, Scott successfully blended these disparate looks together, with key looks including a brocade utility jacket and trousers and a denim baroque printed jacket and jeans set.

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