Your browser is no longer supported. For the best experience of this website, please upgrade to a newer version or another browser.

Your browser appears to have cookies disabled. For the best experience of this website, please enable cookies in your browser

We'll assume we have your consent to use cookies, for example so you won't need to log in each time you visit our site.
Learn more

Hit or Miss: womenswear autumn 18

Drapers’ secret shopper tests womenswear retailers at the Lexicon Bracknell

Lexicon Bracknell

Lexicon Bracknell

Leaves are falling, the nights are drawing in and the high street’s autumn collections have landed on shop floors. As customers turn their attention to cosy jumpers and thick outerwear (or so retailers hope), Drapers’ secret shoppers headed to Berkshire’s Lexicon Bracknell shopping centre for our twice-yearly high street Hit or Miss review. First up for examination were womenswear retailers, including Marks & Spencer, Next and H&M.

The Lexicon Bracknell is a relatively new retail development. Designed to reflect the area’s surrounding greenery, the Lexicon first opened its doors to the public in September last year. A cathedralesque roof made from a lattice of glass and wood welcomes shoppers, making the development feel light and bright. The ambitious £240m shopping destination aims to become a new retail hub for Berkshire, drawing consumers away from nearby Reading and Guildford.

Stores were judged on their product offer, presentation, value for money, customer service and overall shopping experience. On today’s tough high street, retailers should be bringing their “A” game across all of these categories to encourage shoppers to part with their cash. Each category was marked out of five, for a maximum total score of 25.

Given that Lexicon is a new retail destination, the general standard of store design was high. Most stores were at the very least easy to shop and there was some eye-catching visual merchandising. Fat Face, Seasalt and Jack Wills have all clearly invested in quirky design. However, the level of service failed to live up to the polished surroundings. All too often, retailers neglected basic customer service – for example, changing rooms were left unattended. Fat Face again shone for service. Primark and New Look deserve an honourable mention for being the only two fast fashion retailers that had staff working on the changing rooms.

Read on to find out who impressed and who needs to improve. Look out for our secret shoppers’ verdict on the Lexicon Bracknell’s menswear and footwear retailers in upcoming issues and online.

Drapers’ visit took place on 8 October.

Store list:

Fat Face 21/25

Seasalt 20.5/25

New Look 17.5/25

Primark 17/25

River Island 16/25

Marks & Spencer 15.5/25

Topshop 15/25

Joules 14/25

Superdry 14/25

Dorothy Perkins 13/25

Next 13/25

Jack Wills 12/25

H&M 10/25

Peacocks 9/25

 

Fatface aw18 (2) crop

Fat Face

Stellar service and a premium experience mean Fat Face scores highly

21/25

Product: 4/5
Presentation: 4/5
Customer service: 5/5
Value for money: 4/5
Shopping experience: 4/5

Excellent customer service and well-thought-out store design make Fat Face shine. Windows are warm and inviting – a large poster with drawings detailing the product design process is a nice personal touch. Inside, whitewashed walls and vintage-inspired details, such as iron coat pegs, suggest a rustic idyll. This is a store with its own personality and a clear handwriting.

Fat Face is also one of very few stores where I am greeted promptly by staff as I enter. Being wished good morning makes a refreshing change from being ignored elsewhere, and gets a big tick. It makes me feel welcome and reassured that staff are on hand if I need help. Good customer service continues throughout my visit. There is someone waiting at the entrance of the changing rooms, who politely directs me to a free cubicle. As I leave, I am approached by another member of staff, who asks whether I like my item and praises my choice. Service is attentive without ever feeling over the top or pushy.

I am equally impressed by the changing rooms themselves, which are lovely. The attention to detail here is impressive. Old gas lamps, wooden trunks and wooden doors make me feel like I am in a seaside cottage, rather than a Berkshire shopping mall.

This is not a trend-driven offer, but it is appropriate for Fat Face’s target customer. Products are high quality and well made, and offer good value for money. An oversized ombré jumper (£49.50) is soft and luxurious, as is a denim shift dress for the same price – both are relatively good value. My eye is also drawn to a pretty ditsy floral print dress in soft purple. The ruffle details on the neckline and cuffs mean the slightly higher price – £55 – is still good value.

Seasalt aw18 (4)

Seasalt

Excellent store design shows off print-heavy product to its best advantage

20.5/25

Product: 4/5
Presentation: 5/5
Customer service: 4/5
Value for money: 3.5/5
Shopping experience: 4/5

Seasalt’s Cornish heritage comes across loud and clear in this pleasant store. A nautical striped cash desk, white wood and blue-and-yellow mural call the British seaside to mind. Seasalt’s attention to detail is impressive – from the selection of Cornish sweet treats for sale by the till to the books suspended from string in the windows. Decking on the walls and abstract prints of boats in the changing rooms are a nice touch. The brand’s personality is expertly expressed. This store is an attractive, relaxing experience and is well-tailored to the target customer.

Service also shines. When I enter the store, I am asked promptly if I need help, and there is also plenty of interaction happening between staff and shoppers during my visit. I am welcomed into the changing rooms, where a shop assistant is talking another customer through various styles and bringing her different tops from the shop floor to try. She is obviously knowledgeable about Seasalt’s product offer and chats about product with a genuine warmth. Service at Seasalt is among the very best I encounter all day.

The retailer prides itself on creating hand-drawn prints, and it is the printed product that really stands out here. Prices are relatively high, but are reflected in product quality, and offer acceptable value for money. Intricate leaves and flowers on a needlecord dress (£79.95) are eye-catching and the fabric is top quality. A lightweight printed raincoat (£39.95) is also good value, given its detailed sunflower design. Equally, a burgundy boat-neck Breton-striped jumper is made from 100% merino wool, and therefore feels worth its £67.50 price tag.

 

New look aw18 (1)

New Look

Trend-driven product and good value makes New Look worth a visit

17/25

Product: 3.5/5
Presentation: 3/5
Customer service: 3/5
Value for money: 4/5
Shopping experience: 3.5/5

Tumbling leaves in leopard print and tartan make for an effective autumnal display in the windows of New Look. Seasonal and vibrant, the windows are appealing.

The theme continues in store. Animal print has already proved one of autumn’s most popular trends, and New Look is clearly looking for a slice of the action. A red leopard print long-sleeved shirt (£14.99) represents an affordable take on the trend, as does a wrap-front leopard jumpsuit (£24.99.) Both are high quality for a relatively low price point, and are good value. Overall, the offer here feels more trend-driven than it does at competitor Topshop. I am impressed by a fashion-forward denim jumpsuit (£29.99) and houndstooth dungarees (£24.99) – both good value. However, the quality of a cream teddy bear jacket (£29.99) is disappointing. It already feels scraggly, and looks as if it has been washed.

Spherical and caged white light fittings elevate an otherwise simple store design. The store is easy to shop and is broadly tidy, but there are a few items sliding off their hangers.

I can see several members of staff on the shop floor, although they do not approach me and stay clustered around the till. There is someone unpacking deliveries in the entrance to the changing rooms, who welcomes me and is happy to go and get alternative sizes when asked. The changing rooms are basic but spacious, and there is plenty of seating down the centre of the area. However, they could be cleaner – mirrors are dusty and there are tags on the floor. The cubicles themselves are smaller than in other stores, although signs above the pegs reading “definitely”, “maybe” and “my stuff” are a nice finishing touch that injects some personality.

 

Primarkuk 949482

Primark

An impressively trend-focused offer makes up for a well-designed but slightly messy store

17/25

Product: 4/5
Presentation: 3/5
Customer service: 3/5
Value for money: 4/5
Shopping experience: 3/5

Quirky neon lights spelling out the word “Primark” pack a youthful punch as I enter this vibrant store. Doodles and scribbles on the walls add to the playful design.

I am impressed by the trend-driven product offer. A blue, grey and white jumper (£13) displayed in the window is prominently displayed on the shop floor and is easy to find. It is a fun, bright product, and the detailed design makes the already bargain price tag feel even better value. The same goes for a vivid rainbow jumper, also £13. A rust wrap dress with tie sides and pearly buttons (£15) is also desirable and on trend, and looks as though it could cost twice its actual price, offering great value for money.

The store is nicely merchandised, which makes it easy for customers to create full outfits. 

Although the entrance is spick and span, I do spot some mess as I move towards the back of the store. Hoodies and tops that should be neatly folded on tables have been rummaged through and left jumbled. A dishevelled Sale section also needs a tidy but, that said, this store is in significantly better shape than other branches of Primark visited on previous Drapers’ Hit or Miss shopping trips.

A seating area complete with charging points should be welcomed by millennial customers who are welded to their phones.

There is a member of staff working in the changing rooms, who politely checks the number of items I have and directs me to a free cubicle. Although not as detailed as the changing rooms at retailers such as Seasalt and Fatface, walls here are decorated with blue graphics and cartoon Primark shopping bags. The changing rooms are spotlessly clean and the mirrors are big. The only criticism is that some parts of the changing rooms are a little dark, although the lighting inside my cubicle is fine. As I leave, the same member of staff is waiting to take back any unwanted items. Service elsewhere is slightly lacking – I do not spot anyone on the shop floor to help customers with queries.

 

River Island

A well-designed store and fairly good service

16/25

Product: 3/5
Presentation: 4/5
Customer service: 3/5
Value for money: 3/5
Shopping experience: 3/5

Triangular neon lights dangling from the ceiling of River Island’s shopfront catch the eye and provide a bright, fun welcome. Mannequins clad in leather and leopard print pose against posters depicting two curvy models in black velvet dresses, part of the retailer’s #Labelsareforclothes campaign. The overall effect is dynamic and high impact, although it is let down slightly by the lack of music playing in the store. Getting the soundtrack right can be a difficult balancing act for retailers, but shopping in silence feels odd, particularly given River Island’s youthful target customer.

A “Just arrived” section at the front of the store makes it easy for customers to find the newest product. Fake leather paperbag-waist trousers (£46) look and feel more expensive than they are. However, value for money is inconsistent in places. A red fake shearling cropped jacket is a fun take on the textured outerwear trend, but the £85 price tag is a little high for the quality.

River Island has clearly put some thought into its changing rooms. Floor-to-ceiling grey curtains with red-trimmed edges provide a dramatic touch, as do the gold-and-white-flecked walls behind the mirrors. Industrial stools in cheerful pastel shades add another welcome point of interest. The great design is let down by a lack of staff and, once again, I am left to wander in and out of the changing rooms without being assisted.

That said, there is some good customer service happening in this store. I can hear staff talking to another customer about her upcoming trip away, offering to order her size in to store and advising on next-day delivery. Staff come over to the till quickly when they see me waiting, and are friendly once engaged.

 

Marks and spencer aw 18

Marks & Spencer

Good product at affordable prices, but more service is needed to make M&S sparkle

15.5/25 

Product: 3.5/5
Presentation: 3.5/5
Customer service: 2.5/5
Value for money: 4/5
Shopping experience: 2/5

Effort has been paid to the visual merchandising at Marks & Spencer. As I enter the store, I am welcomed by a display of autumnal product set against a pretty indoor tree and graphic grey carpet. Cacti, vases and glossy fashion magazines dotted around the shop floor lend a premium finishing touch. New product is neatly flagged with yellow signs, making it easy for regular shoppers to cut to the chase and find something they have not seen before.However, the store is deathly silent. The M&S customer probably does not want to be blasted with loud pop music, but something to add a bit of atmosphere to this store would be welcome.The womenswear area is split into sections for each of the retailer’s sub-brands, including Per Una, Limited Edition and M&S Collection. I spot some good product across the various brands, including a Limited Edition floral print tea dress (£45) with contrasting cuffs and tie waist and a Per Una animal print jumper with a hint of sparkle (£35.) A contrasting animal print pleated midi-skirt (£35) is another star product and has clearly been a hit – it is almost completely sold out when I look for it online later. Prices are excellent for the quality of the product, and offer good value for money.However, there is not a clear enough handwriting across the sub-brands to distinguish them from each other. It is difficult to tell what makes one product Per Una, another Limited Edition and another M&S Collection.M&S could excel on service to give it a clear identity and point of difference on the high street, but my experience was only so-so. I am not greeted by staff when I enter the store, unlike Fat Face and Seasalt, and I do not see staff on the shop floor itself while I am browsing. There are assistants at the changing room, who are pleasant and smiley, but they wave me through without counting how many items I have.

 

Topshop fw18 wsw 08

Topshop

Some good product at affordable prices, but not as fashion forward as expected

15/25

Product: 3/5
Presentation: 3.5/5
Customer service: 2.5/5
Value for money: 3/5
Shopping experience: 3/5

This is a well-executed store, although perhaps not the most inspiring or innovative in Topshop’s estate. Zig-zagging neon ceiling lights, marble details and a vivid zebra-print accent wall add youthful pops of interest to an otherwise simple, but light store. Everything is spick and span, as it should be first thing on a Monday morning. Topshop is one of several retailers during my visit that is running a mid-season promotion, but the Sale section is neat and does not detract from the overall shopping experience.

The offer in this store is not as fashion forward or trend driven as Topshop stores on previous Hit or Miss visits, perhaps reflecting the Lexicon’s target customer. However, there is some nice product around. A tan tailored coat feels thick and sturdy for its £65 price tag, and a £59 zip-up Borg jacket, available in pale pink or cream Borg, is a nice example of the trend at a reasonable price. The texture of the jacket is soft, and it is high quality when compared with similar styles spotted elsewhere. Plenty of detail makes a vintage-inspired rust polka-dot midi dress (£49) also feel good value. A concession at the back of the store from partywear-focused brand Lace & Beads adds a point of difference, but the quality of some of the product here is patchy. Velvet polka dots have rubbed off several mesh dresses, and threads are loose.

Changing rooms are functional but pleasant. Although the individual cubicles are relatively small, they are tidy and there is seating. However, as with many of the retailers visited, the changing rooms are completely unmanned, and there are no staff in sight. There is a button on the wall to call for help, but no one comes when I push it. Staff stay clustered around the till point, although they are friendly when approached, and offer to order in my chosen item in a smaller size when it is out of stock.

 

 

Joules aw18

Joules

High prices and spots of mess detract from a solid lifestyle offer

14/25

Product: 3/5
Presentation: 3/5
Customer service: 2/5
Value for money: 3/5
Shopping experience: 3/5

Painted in a bright sunshine yellow, Joules’s cheerful shopfront steals attention from its more sombre neighbours. This is nicely complemented by a display of paper leaves in shades of yellow and purple, although the actual product in the windows is less inspiring. All the womenswear mannequins are wearing a combination of striped Breton tops and jeans. Granted, Joules is well-known for this look, but it could have also taken the opportunity to show something different.

Overall, the shop is nicely presented. Framed colourful prints and quirky light fittings liven up white walls. Relaxing music feels appropriate and creates a pleasant in-store ambience. The Sale area is neat and contained, but there are some things out of place. A few jackets and a pair of disembodied mannequin hands have been left abandoned on displays.

I only spot one staff member during my time in the store, which, once again, means that the fitting area is unattended. The changing rooms themselves are welcoming – customers are greeted by a tempting squashy sofa in a vibrant yellow as they enter, and more framed prints on the walls of cubicles add a premium edge. When approached, the member of staff I speak to is friendly, and I also hear her complimenting another customer on her choice of scarf. She is able to offer advice when I ask how a product is supposed to fit.

The clothing range is complemented by a nice lifestyle offer, such as printed wellingtons. Prices are high in places. A short mustard yellow puffa jacket (£169) is more expensive than similar styles at both Fat Face and Superdry, but does not seem to be better quality. A heavily embroidered statement jumper is pretty enough to just about justify the £79.95 price tag for customers looking to spend a bit more on something special, although the fact that it is mostly acrylic, rather than wool, is disappointing.


 

 

Superdry

Superdry

14/25

A lack of service lets Superdry down

Product: 3/5
Presentation: 3/5
Customer service: 2/5
Value for money: 3/5
Shopping experience: 3/5

Pumping music drifts out of the front of Superdry’s large shop into the relative calm of the surrounding shopping centre. The Lexicon Bracknell branch is a typical example of the retailer’s industrial store design. Blue glass decorates the front of the store and, inside, product hangs on hooks from thick ropes and sits on oversized wooden tables.

Superdry is known for big branding, and has cleverly tapped into the current popularity of 1990s logos for its more trend-driven product. This works well on a pair of skinny jeans with logo detailing down both legs (£49.99) and a scarlet sweater with vintage-inspired branding (£44.99). However, a sports-inspired bodysuit emblazoned with “Superdry” is expensive at £26.99 – younger customers to whom the style would most likely appeal can find considerably cheaper alternatives online. I am impressed by Superdry’s extensive outerwear offer. A cropped bomber jacket (£114.99) available in array of colours has an impressively luxuriant fake fur collar and cosy fleece-lined hood. The level of detail makes it good value. A camouflage parka jacket, also fairly priced at £99.99, feels like it would protect from the elements once the temperature plunges.

Wooden changing rooms are well designed and there is seating outside, complete with plugs for customers to charge their phones. Some wear and tear is starting to show, however – the floor of my cubicle is stained and dusty. It could do with a sweep. Most disappointing is the lack of interaction between customers and staff.

Someone on the nearby till point watches me both enter and exit the changing rooms, but makes no effort to approach me. She is friendly when I go over and ask for a product to be reserved.

 

 

Dorothyperkins 8244841499080932

Dorothy Perkins

This retailer lacks a clear handwriting on today’s crowded high street

13/25

Product: 3/5
Presentation: 3/5
Customer service: 2/5
Value for money: 3/5
Shopping experience: 2/5

Windows at Dorothy Perkins lack personality when compared with much of the rest of the high street, including Primark, Fat Face and Seasalt. Although there is some nice visual merchandising – such as a mirrored glass wall and campaign images set against light boxes – the store also does not feel as fresh or exciting as some of the others I visit during my time at the Lexicon Bracknell. There could be significantly more attention to detail to lift the otherwise simple design. Although the store is neat and tidy, the amount of product crammed into the space makes it feel a little overcrowded in places.

Dorothy Perkins delivers a grown-up take on the season’s trends. A leopard print mini-shift dress (£29) with three-quarter-length sleeves is an elegant spin on what has the potential to be a garish print. My eye is also drawn to a chain print red top (£26), which is distinctive, on trend and good value. I am impressed by the level of detail, including metallic threads and a ribbon-tie back, on a green, pink and white striped jumper (also £26). All offer good value for money.

The changing rooms, which are unmanned, are a bit disappointing. There are none of the quirky design details spotted at retailers such as Fat Face and River Island. All the stools have been taken out of the cubicles and lined up against one wall, which does not add much to the overall effect.

I am not greeted or approached by staff during my time in the store, which is a shame. I spot one member of staff who stays by the till point but happily talks another shopper through the best way to use the retailer’s app.

 

Next

Bland product combined with absent service makes for a disappointing visit

13/25

Product: 2/5
Presentation: 3/5
Customer service: 2/5
Value for money: 3/5
Shopping experience: 3/5

Despite good store design, the overall experience at Next is disappointing. Windows are promising, showing off some seasonally appropriate knitwear nicely accessorised with hats and scarves. Digital screens add movement.

There are also some eye-catching details scattered around the large store, such as folding decorative glass screens embossed with leaves and plants. However, dusty mirrors could do with a good wipe and I also spot some discarded plastic wrapping left abandoned on the floor.

A display of mannequins clad in jeans and simple navy jumpers clustered at the front of the store is an unexciting way to welcome customers. It feels like a missed opportunity – why not show off something customers could not get elsewhere on the high street?

Masses of simple tops and checked shirts make for a repetitive and samey product offer, although Next has cracked knitwear. The level of detail on a pale pink jumper with an applique heart and red piping on the sleeves makes the £26 price tag a bargain and great value. A cream jumper with rainbow-hued bobbles (£36) is another unique product at a good price. Quality is patchy in places. A short Borg coat in rust (£52) is soft to the touch, but I am disappointed by the scratchiness of a glittery navy party dress (£45).

Changing rooms have the potential to be first class. Gold lights, greenery and plenty of seating give the space a homey and welcoming air. Dark wood and curtains, alongside charcoal grey stools, make each cubicle feel premium and private. However, there is also rubbish on the floor here, and there are no staff around to help the various customers coming in and out of the changing rooms. This is both a missed opportunity for customer service and a security risk.

 

 

Jack wills aw18

Jack Wills

Impactful store design, but poor service and expensive product

12.5/25

Product: 3/5
Presentation: 4/5
Customer service: 1.5/5
Value for money: 2/5
Shopping experience: 2/5

Great care has been paid to the store design at this branch of Jack Wills. Antique-looking brass lamps, squashy leather armchairs and impressive antlers mounted on the walls make the store feel like an old country house. This continues in the changing rooms, where large gilt-edged mirrors, distressed finishings and an array of framed prints add to the rustic atmosphere.

It is an effective way of expressing what the Jack Wills’ brand is all about, but the impact is tempered by the number of promotional signs around the store. Sale signs in the window are elegantly done, but various promotional notices inside take the edge off what could be a premium environment. This is compounded by large, messy Sale section on the left hand side of the store.

The product offer is relatively simple and pared back. There are plenty of branded T-shirts – originally £26.95 but on promotion during Drapers’ visit. A pink hoodie (£49.99) is pleasingly soft and there is some pretty floral embroidery on a cropped black hoodie (£64.95), but prices are high for fairly basic pieces, and do not provide the best value for money. Similarly, a wool-blend Chelsea overcoat (£199) is sharply tailored, but the price feels out of step with what the retailer’s target young shopper is willing to pay. Black trousers with white piping down the sides (£59.95) feel cheap and synthetic.

Service is lacking. I am the only customer for most of my visit, but am not greeted or approached by either of the two members of staff I see on the shop floor. There is also no one manning the changing rooms. Being ignored in a quiet store makes me feel unwelcome.

 

Hm aw 18

H&M

A messy store fails to improve a broadly uninspiring product offer

10/25

Product: 2/5
Presentation: 1/5
Customer service: 2/5
Value for money: 3/5
Shopping experience: 2/5

H&M’s windows are dedicated to promoting its collaboration with British heritage textile brand William Morris. The collection is attractive and good value, and pieces, including a £12.99 patterned blouse, are easy to find on the shop floor.

However, there is no getting around the fact that this store is a mess. Displays of jeans and jumpers at the front of the store that should be neatly folded are rumpled and in disarray, which is particularly disappointing as it is one of the first things I spot when walking in. First impressions matter. The mess continues as I walk through the store. Coats are unbuttoned and sliding from hangers. A Sale rail towards the back of the store is very messy and difficult to browse.

I am also disappointed by the lack of trend pieces, especially when compared with value rivals New Look and Primark. Aside from the William Morris collaboration, there is very little here that grabs my attention. I do like a soft, fine knit jumper in lilac – excellent value at £19.99 – and a surprisingly soft black fake fur jacket (£59.99).

Service is almost non-existent. I do not spot any staff on the large shop floor – they are only serving customers at the till, where there is a long queue. Changing rooms are light and bright. Long curtains in varying shades of blue and turquoise and seating make the space a pleasant enough place to be, but there are no staff around. The changing area is relatively busy and it is later in the day, so there is no excuse not to have someone keeping an eye on customers who might want to try things on. Fast fashion retailers such as H&M might not be known for hands-on customer service, but getting the basics right is important.

 

 

Peacocks

This lacklustre store needs a refurb to highlight some nice product

9/25

Product: 3/5
Presentation: 1/5
Customer service: 1/5
Value for money: 3/5
Shopping experience: 1/5

Peacocks’ budget product offer is matched by an equally budget – and unattractive – store design. This branch feels old fashioned and in need of a refit. Leaves have blown into the entrance of the shop from the street outside, making a mess. A crisp packet lies abandoned on the floor. Stark white walls, grey floors and harsh lighting make the store environment feel cheap and unwelcoming. There is also a lot of product – not all of it fashion – crammed into the store. Random displays of sweets and garish toys do not make this a relaxing or pleasant place to purchase clothing.

The changing rooms are unquestionably the worst I see all day. They are extremely close to the shop floor, offering little privacy. Rickety black doors make the space feel flimsy and exposed. There is no seating and no staff. The space is clean, but this is probably the only upside – customers would be better off trying things on in the comfort of their home.

I spot a few people working on the shop floor but am not greeted or approached. Staff stay together in a cluster chatting as I head towards the changing rooms to try an item on.

The product offer, however, is much better than the surrounding store would suggest. There are lots of basics, including roll-neck tops for an affordable and good value £6, and vest tops for £3. There are also flashes of the season’s key trends. A 1970s-inspired mustard floral dress (£12) displayed in the windows is easy to find on the shop floor and feels like good quality given the very budget price. Tie-waist trousers in olive, navy and white stripes (£18) are a great product at a purse-friendly price. A grey jumper with pearl embellishment (£22), also available in mustard, is a fun statement piece. Prices are fair for the quality. It is a shame the store itself does not provide a better backdrop for the product.

 

 

Have your say

You must sign in to make a comment

Please remember that the submission of any material is governed by our Terms and Conditions and by submitting material you confirm your agreement to these Terms and Conditions. Links may be included in your comments but HTML is not permitted.