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London catwalks: day two highlights including Cottweiler, Christopher Shannon and Tinie Tempah

The second day of London Fashion Week Mens showed the variety of talent on offer, from emerging brands to established names, alongside Tinie Tempah’s LFWM debut.

Cottweiler

Cottweiler

Cottweiler

Cottweiler’s Ben Cottrell and Matthew Dainty showed one of the strongest collections of day two, elevating their unique blend of techy and functional athleisure through detailed fashion forward designs and considered textile choices. In a nod to the trend for travel we’ve already seen at LFWM, the great outdoors and a camping clothing were given the Cottweiler treatment for autumn 17, but through an urban, streetwear and fashion lense. Iterations of the tracksuit were key, chopped up and panelled in an array of green, blue and purple shades. As always with the duo fabric choice helped give the collection its unique edge. Zip through jackets, over the head tops and cargo pants with elongated skinny pockets at the knee appeared in an array of silky fabrics, techy fuctional nylons and soft, cosy fleece, creating interesting contrasts.

Christopher Shannon

christopher shannon

Christopher Shannon

As expected, our troubled times appear to be making an impact on the catwalks this season, but Christopher Shannon approached it in his typically tongue in cheek way. His signature sporty staples had a 1990s football terrace vibe, with multi-coloured panelled tracksuits and denim jackets sliced with opened seams fastened with poppers – remember them? – alongside shredded denim and webby knits. Washed out neon (a trend to watch) looked like builder’s old high-vis vests, trimmed in branded Shannon taping, while there was a skiwear feel to the fleecy athletic leggings and protective oversized puffa pants, sallopette-like dungarees and parka coats. Elsewhere, T-shirts and jumpers came splashed with ironic parodies of well-known brands – Tumbleweed in a nod to Timberland, Loss International winking at Boss International, and Calvin Klein’s CK turned CS logo written out as Constant Stress.

E Tautz

e tautz

E Tautz

Scarecrows were the unlikely inspiration for E Tautz’s autumn offering, expressed through a series of heritage materials and slouchy suiting, which gave the collection a sense of pastoral whimsy. With a subtle fuzzy texture to the materials, the looks held a softness which when paired with the almost fluid movement of oversized items created a romantic mood. Mossy neutrals and indigo denims continued the countryside aesthetic, and assisted in giving items an almost vintage feel. 1940s double breasted suits were paired with 1970s wide rimmed glasses and 1990s cagoules, with the muted colour palette acting as a thread tying each influence soundly into the overall tone.

Astrid Andersen

astrid andersen

Astrid Andersen

Textural opulence and excess in the form of flowing silks, brocades and plush velvets were paired with rich jewel tones of gold, ruby and mossy emerald to give a sense of luxury to the clothes on Astrid Andersen’s runway. These regal themes were continued via renaissance shaping, with exaggerated shoulder silhouettes and pulled waists redolent of the status clothing worn by the likes of Henry VIII. Undercutting these lofty inspirations was the street aesthetic which drives Andersen’s collections. Tracksuits, puffer jackets, boxing style gowns, pyjamas and cagoules were the basis for the decadent fabrics. Standout items included a velour tracksuit in cream and burgundy, and sweeping colour blocked fur parkas. A sense of gauche, street power dressing pervaded the catwalk, with the overall tone one of masculinity clashed with an extravagant dandy flair.

What We Wear

what we wear

What We Wear

Rapper Tiny Tempah made a slick debut at LFWM this season, with his new label launching with a glossy runway show. Styles were predictably street influenced, but heightened by crisp details and clean lines. White dominated the colour palette with hints of navy and grey giving a sophistication to distinctly urban styles. Bomber jackets and casual separates dominated, with trousers featuring a subtle side striped detail. A footwear collaboration with Nike in the form of jet black and bright white WWW branded trainers accentuated the minimalist tone of the designs. A translucent rain mac and grey marl side split tracksuit trousers stood out for a more directional take on streetwear. The collection was polished and accomplished, and certainly very commercial.

Oliver Spencer

oliver spencer

Oliver Spencer

Oliver Spencer’s autumn 17 catwalk showcased refined and classic tailoring, sophisticated colours and quirky details in one of his strongest collections for seasons. Looks held a polished sense of cool as models sauntered down the runway, twirling umbrellas or topped with a quirky shearling hat. While colours were typically muted, with autumnal tones of navy and greens, the materials added a depth to the items, with velvet, corduroy and leather all featuring. Tonal colour blocking on the jackets also added a distinction to the looks, ensuring even the most simply tailored jackets were refined and desirable. Standing out in the range were the oversized parka coats, which transform into backpacks, creating a dramatic, cape affect.

Tourne de Transmission

tourne de transmission

Tourne de transmission

A gothic, post-apocalyptic tone pervaded the presentation from Tourne de Transmission. Dishevelled and distressed separates such as grungy check shirts and black tie die coats were paired with flashes of green, graffiti slogans and white noise patterning to give a disconcerting, rave tinged aesthetic. Alongside these pieces were medicinally white ensembles and separates, which gave a futuristic, dystopian feel.

Matthew Miller

matthew miller

Matthew Miller

Matthew Miller presented a dark and moody offering that continued to play on the political themes of his most recent collections. Looks were almost entirely black, with minimal separates such as signature hoodies, leather jackets, bombers, shearling jackets and tailored coats cut in simple shapes to give a modern, minimalist sense of gothic. Contrasting to these clean silhouettes were the darkly whimsical touches of flowing floral scarves that came draped around shoulders. Strict tailoring was worn with longline tops and knits that had a streetwear feel, fused with an almost military modernity to give a sense of contrast.

Edward Crutchley

Crutchley

Crutchley

Inspired by renaissance portraiture, archival English silks, Greek antiquities and 1990s MTV, the autumn 17 Edward Crutchley presentation was sophisticated, luxurious and playfully experimental. Rich silk brocade appeared throughout, notably in burnished copper and silver puffer jackets, loose fitting boxy shirts and soft tailored trousers. Cashmere knitwear added a sense of cosiness to the looks, with oatmeal coloured cardigans and khaki thigh high socks paired with knitted underwear for a quirky, modern touch.

Casely Hayford

casely hayford

Casely Hayford

The father and son duo behind Casely Hayford described their autumn 17 collection as a celebration of father Casely Hayford’s 30 year career in fashion. On paper, this meant looking back into Joe’s archives and digging through references from the 1980s, 1990s and early 2000s. This culminated in a collage of clothes that mixed trends, fabrics and silhouettes to create a mix of newness. Successful examples included a great technical style parka with oversized collar that had a sporty, functional feel but came in a lovely textured wool. Other tailored coats came cut down the middle, with different fabrics used for the fronts and the backs. Suits were built from mismatched tailoring, like a boxy DB blazer worn with pin stripe trousers and teamed in off kilter cropped knitwear.

The brand also unveiled its first full womenswear range, inspired by the same collage of references, alongside suitably collaged shoes created by footwear designer Helen Kirkum.

Lou Dalton

lou dalton

Lou Dalton

Lou Dalton’s autumn collection was characterised by a muted colour palette. Soft charcoal and terracottas dominated, with a fuzzy sheen giving Dalton’s signature knitwear a softer, more gentle appearance. Pops of bright colour made an appearance in patchwork across co-ordinating jackets and trousers, as well as in scarves and footwear. Paired with blue denim, the brighter items gave a sophisticated colour pop, and when paired with white suiting lent a slightly 1970s feel.

Katie Eary

Katie Eary

Katie Eary

Katie Eary added some slinky sexuality to a 1970s-inspired collection for autumn 17. Silky printed pyjama sets - chest revealing shirts and wide, slouchy trousers - were worn with louche shawl collar dressing gowns.

Prints had a colourful retro vibe, with bold stripes dropping into psychedelic swirls in classic Eary pinks and oranges, alongside a lizard repeat print.

Strokeable teddy bear fur coats and boxy, often cropped knits that were strewn with floaty feather strands added a textual element.

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