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London Collections Men: the buyer's view, day two

MatchesFashion.com’s head of menswear Damien Paul shares his views on the second day of LCM spring 17, including his standout shows and predicted key buys.

How was day two at London Collections Men spring 17?

Day two of still felt disparate with lots of energy, colour and clashing of fabrications but certainly no clear moods. There have been no real trends or themes emerging for spring 17 yet.

One thing to note: I felt that, given the current trend for gender-merging shows and cruise collections that perhaps we’d begin to see collections that felt almost “seasonless”, but this has not been the case. The collections have all felt very light with lots of flesh, particularly legs – shorts look set to be a key buy for next summer.’

Which collections stood out today?

I liked Agi & Sam’s show, which had really interesting layering and juxtapositions of fabrics. Truth be told, I never thought I’d see Del Boy on the catwalk and now I have [on a T-shirt]. Certainly an Instagram moment.

E Tautz was clean and simple. The collection felt very grown up and is very commercial. I liked the shorts with jackets which felt modern, and [designer Patrick Grant’s] denim pieces were great with a good shape.

At the other end of the scale Nasir Mazhar had a really lovely energy and the diverse casting worked well for a collection that harked to 1990s clubbers.

AGI AND SAM, NASIR MAZHAR, E TAUTZ

AGI AND SAM, NASIR MAZHAR, E TAUTZ

AGI AND SAM, NASIR MAZHAR, E TAUTZ

There was also a distinct energy at Edward Crutchley with rich prints and latex socks.

I enjoyed the bleached tie dye worn with aqua and paisley at Casely-Hayford. There was a considered use of layering with soft textures and loose tailoring. Charming use of mix and match.

It was the opposite at Cottweiler, which was clean, strict and refined. Its minimal approach to sportswear is developing brilliantly with clever use of slightly sheer, crisp fabrics.

Find out Harvey Nichols’ head of menswear thought of day one here.

Cottweiler

Cottweiler

Cottweiler

 

 

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